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Ping Ze: a Book

Ping Ze: a Book

Editorial Design, Bookbinding, Calligraphy, Historical Research

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A part of the thesis project completed for the MFA in graphic design program at Boston University. 

This project investigates the classical Chinese ci poetry, and explores how to translate abstract literary and phonological concepts into visual elements, in order to make them more accessible to the audience regardless of their knowledge of the Chinese language. 

In Middle Chinese, all of the Chinese characters are divided into two groups based on their tones: ping, literally “level”, meaning no pitch changes when the character is pronounced; and ze, literally “oblique”, meaning with pitch changes when pronounced. This idea of ping vs. ze is especially important to the ci poetry, because a series of metric patterns, referred to as "tunes", regulate the tone of each character in a poem: whether it needs to be a ping character or a ze one. Each of these tunes is associated with a title, called cipai, which serves as a code name, since usually the title does not describe the tune itself and has nothing to do with the content of the actual poem. 

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The project includes a series of posters seek to visually represent the pingze patterns of a selection of tunes, as well as the disconnection between the tune titles and their meanings. See the poster series here.

This book accompanies the poster series,  compiling the historical research done throughout the design process, in order to provide more background information to the audience. The book is bound in the traditional dragon scale binding to reflect the subject of the project, as the majority of preserved dragon scale books are rhyming dictionaries used to regulate the pronunciations of the Chinese language at the time, as well as to guide the composition of classical poetry. 

The book was written in both Chinese and English, and covers four topics concerning the project: Chinese phonology and pingze, Chinese classical ci poetry and tune titles, Chinese calligraphy and the cursive script, and Chinese bookmaking and the dragon scale binding. 

 
 

See the poster series here.